This course is offered in;

  • Endodontics

    The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry degree in Endodontics for general dentists wishing to develop their clinical skills and professional knowledge in this discipline in order to practice as a specialist.

    The Doctor of Clinical Dentistry is a three-year full-time course where students spend approximately half the time in clinical sessions. These clinical sessions are supervised by experienced specialist endodontists and students learn contemporary endodontic techniques including the use of the operating microscope and rotary nickel-titanium instrumentation. Each student will have access to a microscope in every clinical session. Approximately twenty percent of the time involves participating in seminars based on the latest research and the remaining thirty percent of the course is taken up conducting research that forms that basis for a thesis of approximately 25,000 words. The thesis is in form of a literature review and at least one manuscript submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Students are encouraged to also publish case reports and literature reviews.

    International and local general dentists with at least two years full-time clinical experience are eligible to apply for admission to this degree. International graduates of the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry who held limited registration with the Dental Board of Australia for the duration of the course and who intend to practice as a specialist in Australia are required to pass the Australian Dental Council examinations prior to applying for specialist registration with the Dental Board of Australia.

    Selection criteria include: undergraduate record, any further formal study, other academic pursuits, clinical experience. Short-listed applicants will be invited to attend an interview involving individual and combined assessments by a selection panel.

    Course Convener

    Professor Peter Parashos BDSc (Melb) LDS (Vic) MDSc (Melb) FRACDS PhD (Melb) FACD FICD

  • Oral Medicine

    Student Supervision

    A good supply of patients is seen through the Oral Medicine Clinic of the RDHM. The students see new patients and reviews, present the cases, discuss management and carry out procedures commensurate with their knowledge and experience. A registered specialist is available on each clinic for supervision and the staff to student ration is one to one.

    The minor thesis is an important component of the course. Students select topics in consultation with their supervisor, taking into account the research interests of staff within the School as well as in other centres. The School allows students to apply for funds to support this research and there is the possibility of using external funding also. Research facilities available include a fully equipped histopathology laboratory, a molecular biology laboratory as well as an image analysis laboratory, Students meet with their supervisor(s) to discuss progress. Theses are examined by one internal and one external examiner.

    Teaching Institutions

    The clinical component of the course involves management of patients with oral mucosal disorders, oral manifestations of systemic disease and the assessment and treatment of patients with oro-facial pain. Progress through the course brings increasing clinical and administrative responsibility to the candidates. Students participate in the teaching of undergraduate dental students for one session per week.

    • DHSV, Oral Medicine Clinic – students undertake clinical sessions in Oral Mucosal disease, temporo-mandibular disorder and oro-facial pain.
    • Skin and Cancer Institute, St. Vincent Hospital – 2nd and 3rd year students attend to clinic a month.
    • Dermatology Dept. Royal Melbourne Hospital – 2nd year students attend to clinic a week.
    • Dental Oncology Unit, Peter MacCallum Hospital - 2nd year students attend to clinic a week.
    • Royal Children’s Hospital - 2nd year students attend to clinic a fortnight.
    • Barbara Walker Centre for Pain Management, St. Vincent Hospital - 2nd year students attend to clinic a week.

    Program Objectives

    The course provides advanced study in oral medicine such that, at the end of the program, the candidate has a detailed knowledge of the scientific basis of the oral pathology, is experienced in diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the oral mucosa and oro-facial pain. The course is undertaken in the Oral Anatomy, Medicine and Surgery Unit of the Melbourne Dental School and consists of seminars, clinical practice and research components.

    Program Description

    Didactic

    The didactic component consists of course work involving basic clinical sciences in particular, oral pathology, oral medicine, oral radiology and relevant aspects of general and forensic pathology and general and forensic medicine. This includes participation in tutorials, presentation of seminars and participation in review meetings at various venues, including the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine.

    Clinical

    The clinical component of the course consists of practice in oral pathology and oral medicine at The School of Dental Science, The Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, the Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute and The Royal Children's Hospital. It may also require attendance at hospital and/or coronial autopsies. This involves management of patients with oral mucosal disorders, oral manifestations of systemic disease and the assessment and treatment of patients with oro-facial pain. Participation in the forensic science activities of the Unit in conjunction with the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine can be arranged throughout the course. Progress through the course brings increasing clinical and administrative responsibility to the candidates. Students participate in the teaching of undergraduate dental students for one session per week.

    Research

    Based on the view that research is essential for development of a critical approach to the subject, candidates undertake a research project, the results of which are presented for examination in the form of a minor thesis (of approximately 25,000 words) which should include one or more papers suitable for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

    Assessment

    Formative assessment is ongoing but more formal formative assessment is held by way of three-monthly interviews. Students receive continuing assessment in clinical work and seminar presentations.

    Summative assessment occurs each year with a written paper and a viva voce for discussion of clinical cases and oral histopathology cases.

    Assignment Requirements

    Weekly assignments are produced by the students on a rotational basis (i.e. each student will be required to present an assignment to the group every three weeks). The presentation of the assignments is via both an essay and discussion. The essay is submitted on the Friday prior to the presentation and discussion that is held each Monday.

    Clinical case presentation occurs every Tuesday with at least an hour long discussion regarding a diverse range of clinical cases from a wide variety of DHSV and non-DHSV sources. Journals are presented, copied and circulated prior to Friday, and students meet and discuss literature from a number of journals.

    Course Convener

    Professor Michael McCullough BDSc (Melb) LDS (Vic) MDSc (Melb) FRACDS PhD (Melb)

  • Orthodontics

    The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry programme in Orthodontics for dental graduates wishing to develop their clinical skills and professional knowledge in this discipline. The course provides both the education and clinical training currently acceptable for specialist registration throughout Australasia.

    The Doctor of Clinical Dentistry programme is a three-year full-time course where students spend approximately half the time in clinical sessions. Approximately twenty percent of the time involves participating in seminars based on the latest research. The remaining thirty percent of the course involves conducting research that forms the basis for a thesis of approximately 25,000 words. The format of the thesis is a literature review and two research papers to be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals.

    International and local dentists with at least two years full-time clinical experience are eligible to apply for admission to this course. International graduates of the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry who held limited registration with the Dental Board of Australia for the duration of the course and who intend to practice as a specialist in Australia are required to pass the Australian Dental Council examinations prior to applying for specialist registration with the Dental Board of Australia.

    Entry to the course is competitive, with approximately twenty applications for each place. Three or four places are offered each year. All applications must be submitted to the University before the closing date. Late applications will NOT be considered. Selection criteria include: undergraduate record, any further formal study, other academic pursuits and clinical experience. Short-listed applicants will be invited to attend an interview involving individual and combined assessments by a selection panel.

    Further details about the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Orthodontics

    Course Objectives

    The Doctor of Clinical Dentistry programme in Orthodontics aims to provide a course of education that allows the graduate student to acquire a thorough understanding of the science of craniofacial biology and its relevance to the development of normal and abnormal skull growth and occlusion, and to the prevention, interception and correction of dentofacial abnormalities by orthodontic means. The course aims to allow the graduate student to develop the ability for independent thought and the ability to solve problems using scientific principles.

    Successful completion of the course provides a sound basis for entry into the expanding specialised area of orthodontics. On completion of the course, the graduate student should be able to:

    1. identify dentofacial abnormalities which require treatment
    2. identify aetiological factors of a malocclusion
    3. determine the most appropriate treatment following consideration of the underlying aetiological factors and the expectations of the patient
    4. provide orthodontic treatment based on scientific principles
    5. advise and consult with professional colleagues in other disciplines on orthodontic aspects of any dentofacial problem.

    Course Outline

    The Doctor of Clinical Dentistry programme in Orthodontics is a three year full-time course which starts in late January of each year and runs throughout the year. Students undertake at least five clinical sessions, as well as case presentation and didactic seminars each week. The rest of the week is for preparation of tutorials or cases, or undertaking the research project. Further clinical tutorials fit in around the clinic timetable.

    Clinical Sessions

    Students in all years of the course undertake at least five clinical sessions per week in the new University of Melbourne Dental Clinic or the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne under the supervision of experienced orthodontists.

    The clinical sessions include all aspects of orthodontic treatment as well as interdisciplinary management of patients in conjunction with paediatric dental, periodontic, prosthodontics, endodontic and oral and maxillofacial surgery units. There are also regular meetings and interdisciplinary clinical sessions with members of the surgical teams at the Royal Melbourne and Royal Children's Hospitals. Other interdisciplinary meetings within the Dental School are regularly scheduled.

    Didactic Seminars

    Formal seminars and literature review sessions take place each week.  The seminars and literature reviews are designed to cover two broad areas:

    • Orthodontic Practice: Background, Theory and Application
    • Orthodontic Biomechanics and Tissue Response, Clinical Application

    Students from all three years of the course attend all seminars and are rostered to research and present topics.

    In addition to these formal seminars, a number of sessions are devoted to topics during which students from all years share ideas, for instance: the rationale for extractions in orthodontics; the management of the Class II malocclusion; the management of the Class III malocclusion; pre- and post-surgical orthodontic treatment timing, etc. A number of visiting teachers also present material.

    Case Presentations

    Each week students from all three years of the course take part in problem-solving for unseen cases. These sessions develop students' skills in listing diagnostic factors, specifying particular problems for individual patients, providing possible solutions for management of those problems and then providing a prioritised overall treatment plan. In most cases, records of completed orthodontic treatment and follow-up are provided as well.

    Research Project

    The research project forms one third of the total course requirement and involves the completion of original research and the submission of a research thesis of approximately 25,000 words.  The thesis represents approximately nine months of full-time effort including project development, conduct of the experimental work, data analysis and thesis and article writing.

    In the first year, all students are enrolled in a research-design subject which introduces students to critical analysis of literature, planning a research protocol and writing a thesis.  This subject is intended to assist students to develop the necessary analytical and writing skills that are needed for thesis preparation and publication.

    In the first year, students also select a research topic and complete a literature review, leading to the development of the research proposal which should be submitted for review by the end of the second semester. The research topic may be one which follows on from previous projects undertaken in the School or it may be a project being taken in a particular area for the first time.  Supervision is available in a number of different areas inside and outside the School.

    By the end of the second year, most of the data should be collected.  Ideally, the first semester of the third year is spent analysing and writing up the project.

    Projects being undertaken by current students include:

    • A proteomic search for biomarkers of orthodontic root loss
    • Impact of molar hypomineralisation on orthodontics
    • Tooth velocity using Invisalign aligners
    • Load deflection characteristics of orthodontic aligning wires
    • Analysis of enamel on debonded brackets
    • Outcomes of maxillary advancement in cleft palate surgery
    • The practical application of 3D-CT dentofacial imaging

    Assessment

    At the end of the first semester, first year students will sit three 3 hour written examinations.  There will also be written exams at the end of first year and second year.

    The final examination consists of written and oral examinations, assessment of unseen cases and presentation of ten Board-style cases.  Generally three external examiners will run the formal examination week.  Usually, one examiner visits from overseas.

    Clinical Supervisors

    • Samar Amari, MDSc
    • Bruce Baker, MDSc
    • Jim Bokas, BDSc Melb, GradDipClinDent, MDSc Melb, MOrth RCS Edin
    • James Curtain, MDSc
    • Kip Homewood, BDSc (Melb), Grad. Dip. Clin. Dent., MDSc (Melb), D.D.S. (Dalhousie), FRACDS., FPFA, AOB Cert
    • Hilton Katz, BDS (Wits), MSc (Wits), MDSc, AOB Cert
    • Giles Plunkett, MDSc, FRACDS
    • Daniel Sable, B Pharm, BDSc, Grad Dip Clin Dent, MDSc
    • A/Prof Paul Schneider, BDSc, MS (Minnesota), CertOrth (Louisiana), Dipl. Am. Board of Orthod., FICD
    • Peter Scott, BDSc, MS (Ilinois), FRACDS, AOB Cert
    • Chris Theodosi, BDSc, MS(St Louis), Dipl. Am. Board of Orthod.
    • Vicki Vlaskalic, BDSc, MDSc, DDS (UOP,CA)
    • Alex Yusupov, MDSc

    Surgical Teachers

    • Patrishia Bordbar, MDSc, MBBS(Hons), FRACDS(OMS)
    • Lisa Crighton, BDS(Adel), MBBS(Adel), FRACDS(OMS)
    • Associate Professor Andrew Heggie (RCH), MBBS, MDSc, FRACDS, FFDRCS, FACOMS, FRACDS (OMS)
    • Alf Nastri, MBBS(Melb), MDSc(Melb), FRACDS(OMS)
    • Tim Probert
    • Jocelyn Shand (RCH), MDSc(Melb), MBBS(Melb), BDS(Otago), FDSRCS(Eng), FRACDS(OMS)
    • Kevin Spencer, BHB, MCChB, MDSc, FRACDS(OMS)
    • Richard Wood

    Didactic Teachers

    • Clin Assoc Professor Sebastian Baumgaertel, DMD, MSD, FRCD(C)
    • Professor Emeritus W Eugene Roberts DDS, PhD

    Course Convener

    A/Professor Paul Schneider BDSc (Melb) MS (Minnesota) Cert Orth (Louisiana) Dip. American Board of Orthodontics FICD

  • Paediatric

    The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry degree in Paediatric Dentistry for general dentists wishing to develop their clinical skills and professional knowledge in this discipline in order to practice as a specialist.

    The Doctor of Clinical Dentistry is a three-year full-time course where students spend approximately half the time in clinical sessions. Approximately twenty percent of the time involves participating in seminars based on the latest research and the remaining thirty percent of the course is taken up conducting research that forms that basis for a thesis of approximately 25,000 words.

    International and local general dentists with at least two years full-time clinical experience are eligible to apply for admission to this degree. International graduates of the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry who held limited registration with the Dental Board of Australia for the duration of the course and who intend to practice as a specialist in Australia are required to pass the Australian Dental Council examinations prior to applying for specialist registration with the Dental Board of Australia.

    Research in Paediatric Dentistry: General dentists wishing to undertake substantial research in the field of Paediatric Dentistry may apply for admission to the Master of Philosophy (MPhil) or the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).

    Course Convener

    Professor David Manton BDSc (Melb) MDSc (Melb) PhD (Melb) FRACDS FICD

  • Periodontics

    The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry degree in Periodontics leading to a specialist qualification which is recognised Australia wide.

    The Doctor of Clinical Dentistry (DCD) is a three-year full-time course where students spend approximately half the time in clinical sessions. Approximately twenty percent of the time involves participating in seminars based on the research papers and the remaining thirty percent of the course is taken up conducting research that forms the basis for a thesis of approximately 25,000 words. The course trains Periodontists not implant dentists.

    International and local general dentists with at least two years full-time clinical experience are eligible to apply for admission to this degree. International graduates of the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry who held limited registration with the Dental Board of Australia for the duration of the course and who intend to practice as a specialist in Australia are required to pass the Australian Dental Council examinations prior to applying for specialist registration with the Dental Board of Australia.

    Please refer to the DCD web page for entry requirements, selection criteria, the course structure and how to submit your application. Prof Darby suggests that, where possible, anyone interested in applying for the Periodontics course arrange to visit the School prior to submitting an application. For more information, please contact Prof Ivan Darby.

    Details about the DCD in Periodontics

    Introduction

    This course covers all aspects of Periodontics including:

    • Development and anatomy of the periodontium;
    • Aetiology‚ pathogenesis and microbiology of gingival and periodontal disease;
    • Examination‚ diagnosis and treatment planning of periodontal diseases;
    • Non-surgical management of periodontal diseases;
    • Surgical management including GBR‚ GTR and mucogingival manipulation;
    • Periodontal/Restorative interrelationship;
    • Periodontal/Endodontic problems;
    • Periodontal manifestations of oral medicine lesions;
    • Periodontal medicine and medicine related to the periodontium;
    • Implant dentistry including surgical placement, site augmentation and the management of peri-implant disease.

    In addition‚ it includes a minor thesis by research‚ clinical supervision of undergraduate dental students and placements in oral medicine clinics and private periodontal practices.

    Objectives

    1. To understand the biological basis of diseases of the periodontium, from the development of the periodontal structures through to the processes involved in destruction and repair of these tissues.
    2. A board general knowledge of clinical medicine and surgery, the interactions of oral and systemic diseases and of the management of the medically compromised patient.
    3. To understand the distribution of periodontal diseases in the population, the natural course of the disease process and the effects of varying treatment and preventive modalities on the course of the disease, as based on critical reading of the scientific literature.
    4. Intensive knowledge in clinical periodontics including the development of a high standard of clinical skills in examination, diagnosis and non-surgical treatment of a range of periodontal patients.
    5. To be exposed to a range of surgical procedures and to demonstrate competency in performing these procedures.
    6. Clinical experience in diagnosis, case selection, treatment planning and surgical aspects of oral implantology.
    7. To gain experience in conducting research in a periodontally-related field.
    8. Skill in evaluating scientific literature, in posing pertinent research questions and hypotheses, in experiemental design, and in the completion and communication of a research project.
    9. A board knowledge of all aspects of clinical and public health dentistry.
    10. Appropriate attitude to ethical and social issues and the place of dentistry in the health care spectrum.
    11. Knowledge and skills expected by the Australian community to act as a periodontist with the highest degree of competency required of a specialist in this field and to meet the requirements of the Dental Boards of Australia for the purpose of recognition of specialist status.

    Entrance Requirements

    Entry to the course is competitive, with at least eight to ten applications for each place. Two or three places are offered every year. All applications must be submitted to the University before the closing date. Late applications will NOT be considered.

    Short-listed listed candidates will be asked to attend for interview at the Melbourne Dental School or the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne. The interviewers will be the convener of the course and Periodontists who are members of the Australian and New Zealand Academy of Periodontists. Interviews should be attended in person rather than by telephone/Skype. However, international students may be interviewed over the telephone/Skype.

    All interviews are in English. The two or three top-placed applicants will be offered a place on the course for the following year. If one of these is declined the next placed candidate will be offered entry to the DCD in Periodontics.

    Successful applicants in the past have generally had the following qualifications and experience:

    • In the top 5-10% of their undergraduate dental course,
    • A minimum of 2 years post-qualification experience, usually at least 3-4 years,
    • Evidence of performance or study at a graduate level. All recently short-listed Australian-based candidates have successfully completed of part one of the FRACDS (or equivalent). Some applicants have had full FRACDS,
    • Post-graduate experience in periodontics either as part of general dental practice, a hospital position overseas, and/or close consultation with a periodontist including visits to their practice,
    • Have attended a number of periodontic/implant CE courses,
    • Membership of the Australian Society of Periodontics (or equivalent) and attendance at local branch meetings. Some have also been members of the Australian Osseointegration Society and attended their meetings,
    • Excellent interpersonal and presentation skills.

    Outline of Course

    The DCD in Periodontics is a three year full-time course starting in January or February of each year and runs for approximately 45 weeks throughout the year. Students undertake five clinical sessions, one session of undergraduate teaching, and one session of case presentations and didactic seminars a week. The rest of the week is for preparation of tutorials or cases, or undertaking a research project. Clinical tutorials fit in around the clinic timetable.

    Clinical Sessions

    Students undertake five clinical sessions per week at the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne or Melbourne Dental Clinic under the supervision of experienced Periodontists.

    Currently the students are rostered on in a combination of Monday morning, Tuesday morning, all day Wednesday, all day Thursday and all day Friday. The first years start with examination, treatment planning and scaling and root planing leading onto surgical therapy towards the end of year one or start of year two. In the second year, more surgical therapy is expected to be performed including implant work up and placement, surgical exposures for orthodontics and crown lengthening. Towards the end of second year and in third year, it expected that students will undertake mucogingival surgery, bone and connective tissue grafting as well as more complicated implant placement. This is in addition to continual treatment of periodontal disease, both in new patients and those in a supportive regime.

    As part of second year students will undertake a 10 week placement in the oral medicine mucosal clinic and visits to private periodontists for practice management lessons.

    The hospital offers Astra, Biomet 3i, Nobel Biocare, and Straumann implant systems, with which the students should be familiar at the end of the course. The hospital has a dedicated six chair specialist periodontic clinic with experienced nursing staff in which all treatment is undertaken on public patients. The patients are referred from public dental centres throughout Victoria and within the hospital itself, and are treated under the Dental Health Services Co-payment system. There are 8 dedicated chairs at the Melbourne Dental Clinic and it is deisgned to resemble private practice. Periodontics has very strong ties with the Prosthodontic, Endodontic, Orthodontic clinics at both venues and as a graduate student you will develop close relationships with graduates from these areas.

    Didactic Seminars

    These seminars are designed to cover the fundamentals of periodontology and range from basic anatomy, microbiology, immunology, periodontal medicine, behavourial sciences, pharmacology to oral pathology and medicine, and form a major component of the written exams at the end of each year. Each student takes turn in researching and presenting topics.

    Clinical Seminars

    With a more clinical relevance, these seminars cover everything from basic examination to implant placement in compromised patients. Again each student takes turns to present topics. These seminars are usually before or after clinics on Wednesdays, Thursdays or Fridays.

    Case Presentations

    To discuss cases and improve presentation of patients, every Monday lunchtime the Periodontal graduate students present a case including charting, radiographs, models and photographs. This again rotates through all the graduate students.

    Journal Reading

    Periodontal graduate students participate in weekly journal club sessions where current papers are presented and discussed. These usually take place on Monday afternoon and again all the students take turns in reviewing current papers.

    Research Project

    The research project forms one third of the total course mark i.e 100 points out of 300. First year is spent learning about research design, identifying an area to be investigated and writing up a literature report and applying for ethics for this area. All first year DCD students attend lectures on research methodology and statistics. In second year most of the data is collected and, ideally, the third is spent analysing and writing up the project.

    A peer-reviewed paper is expected to be published in a leading Periodontal or Implant journal. Students are encouraged to undertake a clinical research project, but laboratory or epidemiological projects may be available. The Melbourne Dental School has a world-renowned position as a leader in periodontal microbiology and immunology. All projects undertaken are under the supervision of the course coordinator. For previous projects applicants are directed to the research literature of the convener.

    Candidates are encouraged to apply for their own research funding.

    Undergraduate Supervision

    Periodontal graduate students undertake one session a week supervising the undergraduate dental students. This ranges from teaching scaling and root planing to 2nd year dental students in the pre-clinical lab to supervision of 3rd and 4th year dental students on the periodontal clinic at RDHM. Some paid teaching sessions may be available.

    Clinical Supervisors

    The course is very lucky to have a wide range of experienced and well-known periodontists who supervise and demonstrate in clinical sessions throughout the clinical year.

    These clinical demonstrators are:

    • Dr Shayne Callis MS(Wits)
    • Dr Andrew Cattermole MSc
    • Dr Matthew Chan DCD FRACDS(Perio)
    • Dr Stephen Chen MDSc, FRACDS
    • Prof Ivan Darby PhD, FRACDS(Perio) (Convener)
    • Dr Robert De Poi MS(Ind) FRACDS
    • Dr Julie Fraser MDSc, FRACDS
    • Dr Gerald Judowski MDSc
    • Dr Victor Kiven MDSc, FRACDS
    • Dr Andrei Locke GDCD, MDSc, FRACDS(Perio)
    • Dr Eddie Lobaza MDSc
    • Dr Neil McGregor MDSc, PhD
    • Dr Dean Nelson MS(Ind)
    • Dr Melinda Newnham DCD FRACDS(Perio)
    • Dr Orit Oettinger-Barak DDS, BSc, MSc
    • Dr Adam Rosenberg MS(UNC)
    • Dr Andrew Tucker MDSc FRACDS FDSRCPS

    Assessment

    At the end of each year, candidates will be assessed in a series of written and clinical exams. These are based on patients treated and topics covered in the seminars throughout the year, and which year the student is in. There is an essay question at the end of semester one and a written paper at the end of semester 2 each year.

    In addition, at the end of semester one there are clinical competency exams and at the end of semester 2 candidates must present a number of cases, depending on year in the course. Lastly there is an oral examination, which can cover any topic in the last University year for 1st and 2nd year students or all 3 years for 3rd year students.

    An overall pass in each part is required for successful completion of the course, which includes the thesis, for the award of the DCD.

    Attendance at meetings and courses beyond the DCD

    In addition to attending full-time, students are expected to attend meetings and courses beyond the DCD course. These include meetings of the local branches of the Australian Society of Periodontics(ASP) and Australian Osseointegration Society, ASP biennial meeting, Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons convocation, Australian and New Zealand Academy of Periodontists meetings, ITI meetings, Continuing Professional Development courses, and courses arranged by international companies such as Astra, Biomet 3i, Nobel Biocare, and Straumann. Usually, there are substantial discounts for graduate students attending these events.

    Research in Periodontics

    General dentists wishing to undertake substantial research in the field of Periodontics or surgical implant dentistry may apply for admission to the Master of Philosophy (MPhil) or the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).

    Course Convener

    Professor Ivan Darby BDS PhD(Glas) FRACDS(Perio) DGDP RCSEng FADI

  • Prosthodontics

    The Melbourne Dental School offers the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry degree in Prosthodontics for general dentists wishing to develop their clinical skills and professional knowledge in this discipline in order to practice as a specialist Prosthodontist.

    The Doctor of Clinical Dentistry is a three-year full-time course where students spend approximately half the time in clinical sessions. Approximately twenty percent of the time involves participating in seminars based on the latest research and clinical advances; and the remaining thirty percent of the course is taken up conducting research that forms that basis for a thesis of approximately 25, 000 words. The format of the thesis is a literature review and a paper to be submitted for publication. Supervision for the thesis will be conducted by the course convener and other academic staff members of the Restorative Dentistry Section.

    International and local general dentists with at least two years full-time clinical experience are eligible to apply for admission to this degree. International graduates of the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry who held limited registration with the Dental Board of Australia for the duration of the course and who intend to practice as a specialist in Australia are required to pass the Australian Dental Council examinations prior to applying for specialist registration with the Dental Board of Australia.

    Research in Prosthodontics

    General dentists wishing to undertake substantial research in the field of Prosthodontics may apply for admission to the Master of Dental Science by research (MDSc) or the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).

    Research in Implant Dentistry and Bone Research

    Dr Roy Judge is also the coordinator of implant teaching at the Melbourne Dental School and Head of the Implant Unit of the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne. He has a keen interest in implant and bone research.

    Course Convener

    A/Prof Roy Judge BDS(Lon), LDS RCS(Eng), MDSc (Melb), PhD (Melb)

  • Special Needs Dentistry

    Special Needs Dentistry (SND) is that branch of dentistry concerned with the oral health of people severely affected by intellectual or physical disability, or by profound psychiatric or complex medical issues. It is a new and emerging Specialty within dentistry and, to date, there are 8 registered Specialist within Victoria.

    The Doctor of Clinical Dentistry (DCD) degree in Special Needs Dentistry at the University of Melbourne has several purposes. In the United Kingdom in 2003, the Joint Advisory Committee for Special Care Dentistry released a document regarding training in Special Needs Dentistry.  Two key aims of training programs in Special Needs Dentistry should enable trainees to “acquire the appropriate knowledge, skills, attitudes and judgement to meet the oral health needs of individuals and groups in society who have physical, sensory, intellectual, mental, medical, emotional or social impairment or disability” and secondly “obtain a sense of professional interest and enquiry, encouraging the Specialist in SND to maintain competency and proficiency throughout his/her career by continuing professional education.”

    The degree is designed to provide students with the opportunity to advance their professional knowledge and skills in SND to a specialist level, and to engage with new and emerging relevant fields of study. The course is designed to facilitate the advanced development of clinical, academic and research skills necessary for a graduate to further a career in specialty practice (both public and private), academia or research.

    The DCD degree in SND is a three-year full time course that provides advanced study and training in all areas of this specialty. Graduates will be prepared for specialty practice in both the public and private sector, or teaching and research in a dental school. Clinical experience is provided at the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne and its associated clinics under the instruction of staff of the University of Melbourne, and other major teaching hospitals where SND Units are present such as The Royal Children’s Hospital, Austin Health, Royal Melbourne Hospital and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre.

    DCD students spend approximately half the time in clinical sessions. Approximately twenty percent of the time involves participating in seminars based on the latest research and the remaining thirty percent of the course is taken up conducting research that forms that basis for a thesis of approximately 25,000 words.

    The SND course commenced at The University of Melbourne in 2006. It has been developed to keep in line with specialty training programs in Special Needs Dentistry both nationally and internationally. It received new program accreditation in 2008 by the Australian Dental Council.

    International and local general dentists with at least two years full-time clinical experience are eligible to apply for admission to this degree. International graduates of the Doctor of Clinical Dentistry who held limited registration with the Dental Board of Australia for the duration of the course and who intend to practice as a specialist in Australia are required to pass the Australian Dental Council examinations prior to applying for specialist registration with the Dental Board of Australia.

    The SND course is currently under the direction of Dr Mina Borromeo who commenced in this position in January 2006. In 2005, Dr Borromeo completed Fellowship Examination in the field of Special Needs Dentistry through the Royal Australian College of Dental Surgeons she also holds a Fellowship in Pain Management through the Faculty of Pain Medicine, Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists.

    In addition to Doctor of Clinical Dentistry students, Dr Borromeo also supervises students wishing to undertake a research degree.

    Research in Special Needs Dentistry

    Special Needs Dentistry is a discipline where the potential for research into a variety of clinical and non-clinical fields is immense. General dentists wishing to undertake substantial research in the field of Special Needs Dentistry may apply for admission to the Master of Philosophy (MPhil) or the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).

    Course Convener

    A/Prof Mina Borromeo BSc(Hons) (Monash) BDSc (Melb) MScMed (Pain Management) (Syd) PhD (Monash) FFPMANZCA FRACDS

If you require further information, email the convener directly.

Next : See what subjects you’ll be studying

Have a question? Make an enquiry
Have a question? Make an enquiry

Thank you for your enquiry. One of our staff members will be in contact within the next three business days.